Everybody remembers the Great Samsung Note 7 Debacle of 2016.  Batteries in the Note 7 started exploding last year and, as of October 13, Samsung officially recalled every single Note 7, including replacement units.

In case you are in the dark, the way it all went wrong is frightening common. Much like the infamous exploding hoverboards, most of our mobile devices use lithium ion batteries for their power, and the liquid swimming around inside most lithium ion batteries is super flammable.

If the battery short-circuits (possibly by puncturing the tiny and super thin sheet of plastic separating the positive and negative sides of the battery) the itty-bitty hole becomes the path of least resistance.

It heats up the liquid at that spot. And, if the liquid heats up quickly enough - BOOM!

Getty Images/iStockphoto

As much as the radical Apple fanboys/girls like to say that this is a "Not-Apple" problem, it is actually a much larger issue.  The real problem is pushing the current battery design to hold more and more.  That is an issue that affects all mobile devices.

Metro UK is reporting that Mat Jones' iPhone was brand new – just seven days old – and that he had only used official accessories to charge it.  That's when it went all 4th of July on him.

I personally have a Samsung S6 Active, and it hasn't exploded on me yet.  Carter and Ginger both have iPhones, and this story drops the smug level at work at least 5 Jobs (the unit of measure for iPhans)