James L. Sutter is one of the most successful game creators of this generation. He's responsible for the role playing games Pathfinder and Starfinder, which have both been runaway successes since their release. He's also been extremely involved in the development of the follow-up games, including the video game releases and expansions.

Additionally he's worked on the award winning, app-driven game series Castle Creeps.

So this guy knows a thing or two about developing a game. Which is why his take on the city of New Orleans is interesting enough to go viral inside the online game community.

Earlier this week, Sutter took to Twitter to share his feelings on the city, if it were turned into him for a video game. Well, not the city itself, but the map of the city. Here are his initial thoughts:

OK, he's easing into it a bit. No direct issues, just saying there are things that would "raise my eyebrows". Not too bad yet, let's keep going:

Alright, now we're getting into specifics, and actually this isn't even Nola. We're going much further south, like Port Eads type south. But that's not his only focus, let's see what's next:

Again, very valid point. We know this is real, but if this were a video game, people who aren't familiar with the area would instantly question this. At least this game developer did, so someone else probably would. Lets see what else he's got:

Yeah, that would stick out like a sore thumb in a game map. So he's got us there. But he's not done...

Again, tough to explain, and if we were on the team making this game map, we'd probably want some clarification too. Does Sutter have anymore? Of course he does:

OK, again, this one would raise an eyebrow in the developers room. Imagine seeing a game-map where you had to run across Lake Pontchartrain at it's widest point. If this was a zombie-related game, or a "battle royal" game, you'd hate life.

Like if you were on the graphics team that was asked to make this map, you'd hate life too.

It's all true. If you were the game developer, and your design team turned in a map of New Orleans, you'd have a lot of questions. Even with answers, some of it would just seem too much for a game, unless you knew about the city before. But ultimately, Sutter leaves the conversation with a compliment: